Documents

Understanding the Seismic Provisions of the 2015 National Building Code of Canada (CNBC) – Computing Forces

The determination of the design forces used to evaluate restraint capacity in the 2015 CNBC is quite different from the methods used in the IBC Based, U.S. Codes. For people who need to work with the Canadian code, in particular those who might also work with the IBC, these differences can cause confusion. Click to …

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Seismic Code Requirements for New Equipment Systems in Existing Buildings

Studies of past earthquakes have shown injuries or fatalities, cause costly property damage to buildings and their contents; and force the closure of residential, medical, manufacturing facilities, businesses, and government offices until appropriate repairs are completed. This paper addresses New Equipment Systems and their relationships to Existing Building Structures, New Additions and Change in Occupancy. …

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Seismic Restraint of Hot Piping

Hot piping, whether it is steam or domestic hot water, presents certain problems for the people laying out and installing seismic restraints. In particular, the piping grows in length as it heats up; the higher the temperature, the greater the growth in length. This paper will discuss the basics of dealing with seismic restraints for hot piping.

Seismic Restraint of Flexible Piping Systems

This paper addresses recommendations for selecting and installing restraints on flexible or flexibly connected piping systems. These systems have the ability to flex significantly when exposed to lateral forces such as those generated by a seismic event. In addition, they can also be pulled apart if subjected to a significant axial load. Because these types …

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Manage Your Risk in Seismic and Wind Design – Use a Qualified Professional Engineer

Non‐structural components such as HVAC equipment, pipe, duct, electrical systems, fire protection, etc., are essential for a building to operate as needed during and after an event such as an earthquake or storm. If building equipment or systems fail, the cost in public safety,and economic loss can be beyond the value of the building. To …

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Calculating Anchorage Capacities for Nonstructural Components Used on 2012 IBC Projects

This document has been drafted as an aid to engineers who are not members of VISCMA, but who may be involved in the attachment and restraint of non‐structural components. It will offer a guide through the code documents detailing the 2012 IBC requirement to increase the design loads by a factor of 2.5 (or reduce …

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