Documents

Delegated Design for Seismic and Wind Load Engineering on Mechanical and Electrical Components

It is well understood that a major construction project is complex, and that one engineer or engineering firm may not have the expertise or experience in all of the engineering requirements that go into such a project. As such, the code allows the responsible engineer of record to delegate design work to other engineers or …

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Computing the Horizontal Seismic Load Effects for Non-Structural Components as Per ASCE 7-16

The current building code (2018 International Building Code) adopted the ASCE 7‐16 Standard from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for calculating the horizontal seismic load effects for nonstructural components. As a result, the analytical method for horizontal seismic demand determination must be validated in accordance with chapter 13 of ASCE 7‐16. Click to …

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Factors that Drive Seismic and Wind Design Loads in the IBC

Seismic and wind design loads in the International Building Code and ASCE-7 are driven by project-specific parameters. Depending on a building’s use and location, these parameters can differ significantly from those of neighboring structures. Most of these parameters can be found in the basis of design in the structural drawing package, generally on the first …

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Understanding the Wind Provisions of the 2015 National Building Code of Canada (CNBC) – Computing Forces

The computation of wind forces when using the National Building Code of Canada differ from those used by the IBC in that they are wind pressure based, rather than wind speed based. Also, to those of us used to working in I-P units, the input data, which is provided in S-I units, needs to be …

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Understanding the Seismic Provisions of the 2015 National Building Code of Canada (CNBC) – Computing Forces

The determination of the design forces used to evaluate restraint capacity in the 2015 CNBC is quite different from the methods used in the IBC Based, U.S. Codes. For people who need to work with the Canadian code, in particular those who might also work with the IBC, these differences can cause confusion. Click to …

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Seismic Code Requirements for New Equipment Systems in Existing Buildings

Studies of past earthquakes have shown injuries or fatalities, cause costly property damage to buildings and their contents; and force the closure of residential, medical, manufacturing facilities, businesses, and government offices until appropriate repairs are completed. This paper addresses New Equipment Systems and their relationships to Existing Building Structures, New Additions and Change in Occupancy. …

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Seismic Restraint of Hot Piping

Hot piping, whether it is steam or domestic hot water, presents certain problems for the people laying out and installing seismic restraints. In particular, the piping grows in length as it heats up; the higher the temperature, the greater the growth in length. This paper will discuss the basics of dealing with seismic restraints for hot piping.

Seismic Restraint of Flexible Piping Systems

This paper addresses recommendations for selecting and installing restraints on flexible or flexibly connected piping systems. These systems have the ability to flex significantly when exposed to lateral forces such as those generated by a seismic event. In addition, they can also be pulled apart if subjected to a significant axial load. Because these types …

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