Documents

SNOW LOAD IS COMING

The most known vibration isolation design forces associated with HVAC applications in the US are Seismic and Wind Load criteria. However, there is a third design force that needs consideration for these systems: snow load. Snow load is an axial force that is applied to roofs and rooftop equipment and is specified in the ASCE …

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Pipe Risers and Their Supports

HVAC piping in a building usually has its longest run in vertical plane in the form of a pipe riser. The length of the run is not immediately visible to those reviewing the building plans, but the scale of the pipe run becomes clear when riser diagrams are reviewed. Click to download

Calculation of Wind Loads on Rooftop Equipment Per ASCE7-16

The IBC mandates that all outdoor equipment and systems, especially those on rooftops, require an engineering calculation to be performed to determine the possible lateral and uplift forces. If this engineering work, which helps determine the necessary attachment methods, isn’t completed we are at risk of equipment and or buildings being damaged, or worse yet …

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Delegated Design for Seismic and Wind Load Engineering on Mechanical and Electrical Components

It is well understood that a major construction project is complex, and that one engineer or engineering firm may not have the expertise or experience in all of the engineering requirements that go into such a project. As such, the code allows the responsible engineer of record to delegate design work to other engineers or …

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Computing the Horizontal Seismic Load Effects for Non-Structural Components as Per ASCE 7-16

The current building code (2018 International Building Code) adopted the ASCE 7‐16 Standard from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for calculating the horizontal seismic load effects for nonstructural components. As a result, the analytical method for horizontal seismic demand determination must be validated in accordance with chapter 13 of ASCE 7‐16. Click to …

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Factors that Drive Seismic and Wind Design Loads in the IBC

Seismic and wind design loads in the International Building Code and ASCE-7 are driven by project-specific parameters. Depending on a building’s use and location, these parameters can differ significantly from those of neighboring structures. Most of these parameters can be found in the basis of design in the structural drawing package, generally on the first …

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Understanding the Wind Provisions of the 2015 National Building Code of Canada (CNBC) – Computing Forces

The computation of wind forces when using the National Building Code of Canada differ from those used by the IBC in that they are wind pressure based, rather than wind speed based. Also, to those of us used to working in I-P units, the input data, which is provided in S-I units, needs to be …

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